To help communities and individuals plan for the risks of sea level rise, heavy downpours, extreme heat, and other climate-change-related impacts, the U.S. Government is releasing today a collection of software tools, datasets and informational resources containing information useful for assessing the impacts of climate change on the transportation facilities, operations, and the transportation system.

Among the products, developed by the U.S. Department of Transportation and other agencies, are

  • Tools for assembling regional downscaled climate projections containing the variables most useful to transportation engineers and planners;
  • Tools for assessing relative sea-level rise, erosion risk, and flooding developed by FEMA, NOAA, USGS and USACE;
  • Geospatial data on the location of US transportation networks;
  • Datasets on passenger and freight movements;
  • Tools for assessing the vulnerability of transportation facilities to climate change;
  • Digital elevation and hydrologic datasets developed by USGS, NOAA, and other agencies;
  • Case studies, methodological guidance, and archived instructional webinars.

These resources will be helpful to State and local government agencies, urban and regional planners, architects and engineers, transportation system operators, and anyone with an interest in climate change impacts.

Launch of Ecosystem-Vulnerability theme of Climate.Data.Gov

(Dec 9th, 2014) The U.S. government has released a collection of data and tools that will advance planning capabilities for the impacts of climate change on our nation’s ecosystems. The data and tools will provide information and will help to stimulate innovation in preparing for climate impacts on fire regimes, water availability, carbon sequestration, biodiversity conservation, ocean health, and the spread of invasive species. Here are some examples of how the data and tools could be used:

  • Help communities and natural resource managers determine if they are currently at risk from wildfires and if they will be impacted in the future due to wildfires becoming more prevalent and severe;
  • Provide information to the public on their sources of water and their sensitivities to climate change;
  • Aid in the public understanding of the role that ecosystems play in mitigating rising carbon dioxide levels due to their absorbing and storing of carbon, as well as how land management activities may influence storage capabilities;
  • Identify the potential impacts of climate change on rare and endangered species, iconic species, and ecosystems;
  • Identify which invasive species may threaten specific locations and their impacts on local communities and their economies. This effort will contribute to early detection, rapid response activities.

Launch of Water theme of Climate.Data.Gov

To help communities and individuals plan for the risks of climate-change-related impacts on water resources, the U.S. Government is releasing today a collection of datasets containing information relevant to this important issue. Select data are also being made available via mapping services on Geoplatform.gov. The resources provided here can be used to help answer a number of relevant questions, such as:

  • How are human and natural components of the hydrologic cycle changing?
  • How can communities and water managers plan for uncertain future conditions?
  • How will changing water resources affect food, energy, ecosystems, and human health?

Launch of Food Resilience theme of Climate.Data.Gov

To help communities and individuals plan for the risks of drought, floods, and other climate-change-related impacts, the U.S. Government is releasing today a collection of datasets containing information relevant to the effects of climate change on the food system.

These data are also being made available via mapping services on Geoplatform.gov. The resources provided here can be used to answer a number of relevant questions, such as:

FOOD PRODUCTION

  1. How will crop yield and production of other food products be affected by changes in climate?
  2. What types of food and locations will be most vulnerable to changes in climate?
  3. How will changes in climate affect the types of food that can be grown in a location?
  4. Under what conditions (i.e., for what types of food and in what locations) will indirect effects of climate change (e.g., pests, pathogens, invasive species, and fire) overwhelm direct effects of increasing temperature and/or changes in precipitation, surface water, or ground water?

FOOD DISTRIBUTION

  1. What parts of the food supply chain will be most vulnerable to climate change?
  2. How will processing, storage, and transportation need to be modified to continue to supply safe food products under a changing climate?

FOOD SAFETY AND NUTRITION

  1. How will climate change impact foodborne illness that includes chemical as well as microbial sources?
  2. How will climate change affect the nutrient content of staple foods?
  3. How will the cost of a balanced diet be impacted under a changing climate?

INTERNATIONAL FOOD SECURITY

  1. What countries are most vulnerable to climate change that affects food yield, quality, and availability?
  2. What segment of the population will be most vulnerable to changes in food prices?

NASA launches Earth Science Challenges

Through the Open NASA Earth Exchange, NASA is challenging innovators to use data from Earth’s satellites in new and creative ways, including for applications that help people understand climate change. Learn more.

Infrastructure and Geographic Map Data for Climate-Preparedness

To help communities and citizens plan for the risks of coastal flooding and other climate-change-related impacts, the Department of Homeland Security, the Department of Defense, the National Geospatial-Intelligence Agency, and the U.S. Geological Survey have released new non-sensitive datasets containing mapping information on hundreds of thousands of the Nation’s infrastructure units and geographical features. These data are being made available via user-friendly mapping services on Geoplatform.gov and Climate.data.gov.